Blue Lotus Absolute

Adam Michael has this to say “Whilst commonly referred to in English as “blue lotus absolute”, this is actually a water lily (Nymphaea), whereas white and pink lotus are true lotus flowers (Nelumbo).
Now, since moving to Italy in 2017 I have had the pleasure of getting to know the aroma of many floral plants that would otherwise be a little challenging for me back in the much loved UK.
As such we now grow Nymphaea caerulea and other Nymphaea caerulea cultivated varieties in big pots of water and soil around our property and our gardens throughout the summer. The photos I am using have all been taken in my gardens, albeit across last summer.

Aromatically the smell of the true living Nymphaea caerulea flowers have a Crayola crayon, waxy like backbone, with lots of sweet heady floral, and spice tinged warmth, that as a Westerner I’d simply describe as “exotic” smelling. The aroma is addictive and burying my nose into the flowers and inhaling the aroma is indeed an enjoyable summer afternoon pastime. Most of the cultivated varieties of blue water lily have a distinct and stronger cherry note in my opinion plus true Nymphaea caerulea flowers sit on the surface of the water, whereas with many of the other varieties (such as my main photo showing Nymphaea caerulea var Lilac Star) the flowers rise well above the water.

Regarding the aroma profile of this blue lotus absolute, the backbone for me is Crayola waxy for sure, but somehow with a dry chalk like trait, and from this you get lots of sweetness, borderline parma violet territory, a little lychee orientated, dewy aspects and with strong hits of mouth-watering cherries, playdough and something lilac powdery-esque with a faint hit of greenness. The aroma profile is mostly consistent throughout, albeit with aquatic green pond nuances showing themselves deep in the dry-down. Applied to neat to my skin, I get around 4 hours of wear and via the strip the aroma is present for over a week. I would describe this aroma profile as almost perfectly representing Nymphaea caerulea var Sterena, which suggests at least to my nose that a cross selection of flowers have been used for this production.

Of a slightly sluggish but easily pourable viscosity, amber to brown red amber in colour subject to weight, cultivated production and a highly enjoyable and luxurious material. 8 out of 10. As for uses, a perfume in its own right, useful within Oriental accords, water themed floral accords and I find this layers very nice with lilac co2, clean smelling ouds (so barn and skank free), ylang absolute and adds a pleasant twist within white floral accords.”

The 1ml, 5ml and 10ml volumes are provided in 10ml amber glass bottles with dropper inserts and screw cap. 50 gram weight is provided in a lacquered aluminium canister, plug and screw cap.

Botanical Name: Nymphaea caerulea

Origin: Thailand